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Spotlights - UMaine and Tribes Work to Protect Brown Ash

Professor John Daigle and Bureau of Indian Affairs forester Mike Benedict inspect a brown ash tree alon gthe Penobscot River

Professor John Daigle and Bureau of Indian Affairs forester Mike Benedict inspect a brown ash tree along the Penobscot River

The Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) is an introduced beetle from Asia which was first detected in Detroit in 2002. Since then, EAB has spread to 14 states and Canada, and is currently just 120 miles from Maine. EAB has devastated ash trees and will likely incur tens of billions of dollars in damages. But for Maine’s Indian tribes, the potential loss of brown ash is beyond dollars. Indeed, the Wabanaki origin story has their ancestors emerging from the brown ash tree, and it continues to play a central role in Wabanaki culture and basketry. Supported by UMaine’s NSF-funded Sustainability Solutions Initiative, Anthropology’s Darren Ranco, and SFR’s Rob Lilieholm, John Daigle, and Bill Livingston are working with local tribes to anticipate and respond to EAB. For more information, visit: http://www.umaine.edu/brownash/

 


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Brittany Ross is currently a Junior in the Forestry program at the University of Maine. She enjoys many outdoor activities including running, hiking, biking, skiing, and swimming. Running is her passion in life. She ran a half marathon last year and hopes to run a full marathon (26.2 miles) this year!

Check out her posts under Student Blogs.